2018 Conference Program


Sunday, September 30, 2018  

8:30 am - 8:45 am

Welcome

Jill O'Donnell-Tormey, Cancer Research Institute, New York, NY

8:45 am - 11:45 am

Session 1: Regulating T Cells and Their Response to Cancer

Session Chairperson: Christoph Huber, Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), Mainz, Germany

Rafi Ahmed, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
T  cell exhaustion and PD-1 therapy

Christian Ottensmeier, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom
Tissue resident memory cells: At the center of tumor control

Refreshment Break

W. Nicholas Haining, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
Genetic screens for immunotherapy target discovery

Nicholas P. Restifo, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Dysfunction and stemness of tumor-infiltrating T cells are triggered by a common mechanism

Roberta Zappasodi, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
Mechanistic rationale to combine GITR agonism with PD-1 blockade in cancer patients*

Jake S. O'Donnell, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia
Neoadjuvant immunotherapy  pre-cancer surgery relieves tumor-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction and restores memory differentiation potential*

11:45 am - 2:15 pm

Lunch and Poster Session A and Exhibits

The following topics will be presented:       

  • Clinical Trials of Cancer Immunotherapies

  • Genetically Engineered T Cells

  • Maintenance of Immune Balance: Effects of Targeted and Immune Therapies

  • Regulating T Cells and Their Response to Cancer

  • Tackling the Tumor Microenvironment - Beyond T Cells

2:15 pm - 2:45 pm

William B. Coley Lecture

Padmanee Sharma, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
From the clinic to the lab: Investigating response and resistance mechanisms to immune checkpoint therapy

2:45 pm - 6:15 pm

Session 2: Tackling the Tumor Microenvironment           

Session Chairperson: Wolf H. Fridman, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France and Dmitry Gabrilovich, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Shannon J. Turley, Genentech, S. San Francisco, California
Stromal activation in cancer immunology and immunotherapy

Jeffrey A. Hubbell, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Using matrix protein affinity to modulate the tumor microenvironment

Miriam Merad, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
The tumor myeloid microenvironment

Refreshment Break

Leonid S. Metelitsa, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
Harnessing natural and engineered properties of NKT cells for cancer immunotherapy

Dmitry Gabrilovich, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
PMN-MDSC and neutrophils: Tale of two cells in cancer

Wei-Wu Tom Chen, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Immune-based classification of soft-tissue sarcoma is associated with clinical outcome and unveils tertiary lymphoid structures as surrogate biomarker for the clinic*

Kevin C. Barry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
A natural killer-dendritic cell axis defines checkpoint therapy-responsive tumor microenvironments*


monday, october 1, 2018

8:15 am - 8:45 am

Keynote Address

Ignacio Melero, Universidad de Navarra, University Clinic and CIMA, Pamplona, Spain
The immunotherapy faces of Interleukin-8 and CD137

8:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 3: Genetically Engineered T Cells

Session Co-Chairpersons: Crystal L. Mackall, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA and Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

James N. Kochenderfer, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
CAR T-cell therapy for lymphoma and multiple myeloma 

Crystal L. Mackall, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
Engineering exhaustion-resistant CAR T cells

Steven A. Rosenberg, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Cell transfer immunotherapy targeting unique somatic mutations in cancer

Refreshment Break

Christine E. Brown, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California
Advancing CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of brain tumors

Michel Sadelain, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
Novel approaches to CAR T-cell engineering

Philip D. Greenberg, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
Utilizing synthetic biology and high-dimensional probing to address therapeutic obstacles and empower engineered T cells with the capacity to eradicate tumors

Christopher A. Klebanoff, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
T cells engineered to overcome death signaling within the tumor microenvironment enhance adoptive cancer immunotherapy*

Clare Y. Slaney, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia
Dual-specific T cells and an indirect vaccine eradicate large solid tumors*

12:45 pm - 2:15 pm

Lunch

2:15 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 4: Maintenance of Immune Balance: Effects of Targeted and Immune Therapies

Session Co-Chairpersons: Catherine Sautès-Fridman, Université Paris-Descartes, Paris, France and Ellen Puré, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Alberto Bardelli, University of Turin and Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Italy
Inactivation of DNA repair to improve immune surveillance

David L. Porter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
CAR T cells: On the road to a cure

Peter Savas, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia
Targeting the immune microenvironment in breast cancer.

Patrick Hwu, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
RAN-editing derived epitopes function as cancer antigens to elicit immune responses

Refreshment Break

Antony Rosen, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Autoimmune rheumatic diseases and cancer

Arabella Young, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Developing syngeneic NOD tumor models to profile immunotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity in response to cancer immunotherapies in autoimmune-prone mice*

Michelle Krogsgaard, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY
Mechanisms of primary resistance to PD-1 checkpoint blockade*


tuesDAY, october 2, 2018

8:15 am - 12:45 pm

Session 5: Novel Vaccine Platforms and Combinations

Session Co-Chairpersons: Nina Bhardwaj, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, NY and Cornelis J. M. Melief, Leiden University Medical Center & ISA Pharmaceuticals, Leiden, The Netherlands

Matthew M. Gubin, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missourri
High dimensional analysis of effective cancer immunotherapy driven by MHC-I and MHC-II neoepitopes

Ugur Sahin, BioNTech, Mainz, Germany
Personalized cancer immunotherapy

Catherine J. Wu, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
Targeting tumor neoantigens to drive effective tumor immunity

Cornelis J.M. Melief, Leiden University Medical Center and ISA Pharmaceuticals BV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Combination immunotherapy of cancer caused by human papilloma virus

Refreshment Break

Alan Melcher, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom
Oncolytic viruses: Potential for in situ anti-tumor vaccination and combination with checkpoint blockade

James J. Moon, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Nanodisc platform technology for cancer vaccination

Robert Seder, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Peptide-TLR-7/8 agonist conjugate vaccines chemically programmed for nanoparticle self-assembly to enhance the magnitude and breadth of anticancer neoantigen CD8 T cell immunity

Liang Deng, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New  York, New York
Intratumoral delivery of engineered modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing Flt3L and OX40L for in situ therapeutic cancer vaccination*

Elizabeth E. Evans, Vaccinex, Inc., Rochester, New York
Reprogramming myeloid cells in TME with pepinemab, first-in-class semaphorin 4D MAb, enhances combination immunotherapy*

12:45 pm - 3:15 pm

Lunch and Poster Session B and Exhibits

The following topics will be presented:

  • Convergence of Technology and Cancer Immunotherapy

  • Microbiome and Metabolism

  • Mutational Analysis and Predicting Response to Immunotherapy

  • Novel Vaccine Platforms and Combinations

  • Trials in Progress

  • Other

3:15 pm - 6:45 pm

Session 6: Mutational Analysis and Predicting Response to Immunotherapy

Session Co-Chairpersons: Ton N. Schumacher, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Ton N. Schumacher, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
T cell recognition in human cancer’

Benjamin D. Greenbaum, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
Measuring the emergence of non-self in tumors

Naiyer Rizvi, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York
Application of TMB in the clinic to predict response to immunotherapy

Refreshment Break

Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Cancer genetics and response to immunotherapy

Vinod P. Balachandran, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
Mapping immune recognition of non-self neoantigens in human pancreatic cancer

Yiyi Yan, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota
CX3CR1+CD8+ T cells are responsible to the clinical benefit of chemoimmunotherapy in metastatic melanoma patients after disease progression on PD-1 blockade*

Stephen Philip Schoenberger, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, California
Functional identification and therapeutic targeting of tumor neoantigens*


wednesday, october 3, 2018

8:15 am - 10:45 am

Session 7: Convergence of Technology and Cancer Immunotherapy

Session Co-Chairpersons: Carl G. Figdor, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands and Özlem Türeci, Ganymed Pharmaceuticals, Mainz, Germany

Nir Hacohen, Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Determinants of effective tumor immunity

Dan Dongeun Huh, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Microengineered physiological biomimicry: human organs-on-chips

Darrell Irvine, MIT/Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Enhancing the function of CAR T cells via a universal vaccine strategy

Martin G. Klatt, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
A new high-performance HLA ligand identification strategy enables prediction of T cell tolerance to neoepitopes*

Liang Chen, Stanford University, Stanford, California
Identification of specificity TCR groups of tumor antigen specific T cells*

Refreshment Break

10:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 8: Microbiome and Metabolism

Session Co-Chairpersons: Guido Kroemer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France and Laurence Zitvogel, Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris, France

Hassane M. Zarour, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Manipulating the gut microbiome to improve immunotherapy of melanoma

Jennifer A. Wargo, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
Targeting the gut and tumor microbiome in response and toxicity to cancer therapy

Yasmine Belkaid, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Control of tissue immunity and repair by the microbiome

Mirco Friedrich, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany
The oncometabolite R-2-Hydroxyglutarate suppresses the innate immune microenvironment of IDH1-mutated gliomas via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor signaling*

Michael G. Constantinides, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Mucosal-associated invariant T cells respond to the cutaneous microbiota and promote skin immunity*

Closing Remarks

Margaret Foti, American Association for Cancer Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

* short talk from proffered abstract


Continuing Medical EdUcation (CME)

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education activities for physicians. AACR has designated this live activity for a maximum of 24.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Credit certification for individual sessions may vary, dependent upon compliance with the ACCME Accreditation Criteria. The final number of credits may vary from the maximum number indicated above.